July 4, 2012

Threat of weather shorten the program, the * not played on the bottom program listing

This material covers the 6th concert –
Wednesday, July 4th, 2012, 8:30p – 9:30p

Site: Medina’s Uptown Park Square
(intersections of Rtes. 18, 42, Broadway and Liberty Street)

Cancellation of concerts due to the weather will be posted on the website!

MEDINA:  Medina Community Band will continue the 2012 summer season, a celebration of 153 years of presenting community concerts in Medina, on Wednesday, July 4th, at 8:30p, in Medina’s Uptown Park Square Gazebo. 

Featured soloists and conductor on this hour-long concert will be: Curtis Amrein (trumpet), Marcia Nelson Kline, Curtis Amrein, and Paul Rocco, trumpet trio; Amy Dragga, Mary Ann Grof-Neiman, Ed Lichtenberg, and Vicki Smith, clarinet quartet;  and, Vicki Smith, clarinet; Marcia Nelson-Kline, trumpet; Lee Harper, trombone; and, Kyle Snyder, Dixieland ensemble,  as well as associate conductor Curtis Amrein. 

The Medina Community Band is under the baton of conductor Marcus Neiman, starting his 39th summer concert series, and associate conductor Curtis Amrein beginning his second summer seasonThe 60 minute concert will feature works by Williams, Anderson, Gershwin, Arlen, Mancini, King, Fillmore, and Sousa.  Medina Community Band is sponsored by the Medina Community Band Association, a standing committee of the Medina Breakfast Kiwanis Club.


Featured Soloists

Curtis Amrein (trumpet soloist, at left) is a band director at Barberton Middle School in Barberton (Ohio). His responsibilities include teaching sixth-ninth grade bands in addition to fifth and eighth grade general music. Under his direction, students in Barberton have received superior ratings at Ohio Music Education Association large group and solo and ensemble adjudicated events.
 

Curtis received his bachelor's degree in music education from The Ohio State University in 2004, where he graduated Magna Cum Laude. While there, Mr. Amrein performed with the Symphonic Band, Wind Symphony, and Symphony Orchestra. He is a trumpet student of Timothy Leasure and was the 2004 recipient of the Richard Burkart Trumpet Award. Curtis' conducting teachers include Dr. Richard Blatti and Marcus Neiman.

Mr. Amrein serves as both an associate conductor and trumpet player with the Medina Community Band. He also performs with the Sounds of Sousa Band, under the direction of Marcus Neiman. Curtis is an active member of the Ohio Music Educators Association, National Association for Music Education (MENC), and Ohio Education Association. The 2012 season is Curtis’ second as associate conductor of Medina Community Band.


Maria Jacobs, soprano voice, Maria Jacobs (soprano) was form in Cleveland (OH).  She is a former traffic reporter and disc jockey, who lived in Los Angeles (CA) for 11 years and sang The Langham Huntington (formerly the Ritz Carlton), The Four Seasons (Westlake, OH), Chava (Beverly Hills), and The Torrance Civic Center. She has released three albums: No Frills, Free as a Dove, and Chasing Dreams. Maria opened for jazz trumpeter Chuck Mangione at The Coach House (Columbus, OH), was featured with the opening act for Bob Doroguh.

While back in the Midwest, Maria performed at the Elmhurst Jazz Festival with The Kent State Jazz Band, and won the attention of judges Mike Abene, Dennis Mackrel and Byron Stripling. She was then invited by Byron Stripling to perform with him and the Columbus Jazz Orchestra.

Maria began singing in the Melkite Catholic Church at a very early age, and soon began sharing the bandstand with her father Mike Jacobs, a drummer in the Cleveland area. Maria has always wanted to sing and began so by doing her rendition of favorite standards, a few of which are heard on her first album entitled “No Frills,” available on iTunes.

In the fourth grade Maria began fifteen years of classical flute study and some piano, gaining a new appreciation for European melody and harmony through much practice and listening. All of these rich, early experiences lead to superior ratings in flute competitions throughout high school, a music scholarship at The Ohio State University 
and singing jobs in area night clubs. 

Conductors

Marcus Neiman (left) celebrates his 40th season as conductor of the Medina Community Band and 39th summer season.  Neiman is a part-time assistant professor of music education at Kent State University where he teaches the “Music Education as a Profession” course and supervises music education student teachers.  He was interim director of the Kent Concert Band during the 2010-2011 academic year, and also taught the “Instrumental Methods for Choral and General Music Majors.”

He received his bachelor of science in music education degree from The University of Akron; master of music in music education degree from The University of Michigan; and, post-degree doctorial work at The Kent State University.

He is a member of the 1993-94 class of Leadership Medina County.  Neiman remains active with Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA), having served as state president of that organization from 1998-2000, and currently serves as a woodwind adjudicator and state historian.  He is the recipient OMEAs highest honor, the “Distinguished Service Award,” presented to him on January 29th, 2010.  Neiman is the artistic director and founding conductor of the professional concert band – The Sounds of Sousa Band and appears throughout the nation as a guest clinician and conductor.

Marcus and his wife Mary Ann, who is a professional clarinetist and program administrator - preparatory and continuing education department for the Cleveland Institute of Music, reside in Medina with their two cats Sasha and Dmitri. Marcus has two daughters (Nancy and Jennifer) from a previous marriage, three granddaughters, one grandson, and a godson.

Curtis Amrein (associate conductor, at right) is a band director at Barberton Middle School in Barberton (Ohio). His responsibilities include teaching sixth-ninth grade bands in addition to fifth and eighth grade general music. Under his direction, students in Barberton have received superior ratings at Ohio Music Education Association large group and solo and ensemble adjudicated events.
 

Curtis received his bachelor's degree in music education from The Ohio State University in 2004, where he graduated Magna Cum Laude. While there, Mr. Amrein performed with the Symphonic Band, Wind Symphony, and Symphony Orchestra. He is a trumpet student of Timothy Leasure and was the 2004 recipient of the Richard Burkart Trumpet Award. Curtis' conducting teachers include Dr. Richard Blatti and Marcus Neiman.

Mr. Amrein serves as both an associate conductor and trumpet player with the Medina Community Band. He also performs with the Sounds of Sousa Band, under the direction of Marcus Neiman. Curtis is an active member of the Ohio Music Educators Association, National Association for Music Education (MENC), and Ohio Education Association. The 2012 season is Curtis’ second as associate conductor of Medina Community Band.  

 

Program Notes

 

Star Spangled Banner (John Stafford Smith arranged by John Philip Sousa) uses lyrics from a poem written in 1914 by Francis Scott Key, a then 35-year-old amateur poet after seeing the bombardment of Fort McHenry at Baltimore, Maryland, by Royal Navy ships in Chesapeake Bay during the War of 1812.

The poem was set to the tune of a popular British drinking song, written by John Stafford Smith for the Anacreontic Society, a London social club.  Set to Key’s poem and renamed “The Star-Spangled Banner,” it would soon become a well-known American patriotic song.  It was recognized for official use by the United States Navy in 1889 and the President in 1916, and was made the national anthem by a congressional resolution on March 3, 1931 (46 Stat. 1508, codified at 36 U.S.C. § 301), which was signed by President Herbert Hoover.

Before 1931, other songs served as the hymns of American officialdom. Most prominent among them was “Hail, Columbia” which served as the de facto national anthem from Washington’s time and through the 18th and 19th centuries.  Following the War of 1812 and subsequent American wars, other songs would emerge to complete for popularity at public events, among them “The Star Spangled Banner.”

John Williams (pictured at left) studied composition at UCLA with Mario Castel­nueovo-Tedesco and later attended the Juilliard School. In 1956, he started working as a session pianist in film orchestras. He has composed the music and served as music director for over 70 films, including Jaws, E.T., Star Wars, Superman, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Schindler’s List, Jurassic Park and Memoirs of a Geisha. Williams has been awarded two Emmys, five Oscars, and 17 Grammy Awards, as well as several gold and platinum records. From 1980 to 1993, Williams served as conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra. He has written many concert pieces and is also known for his themes and fanfares written for the 1984, 1988, and 1996 Olympics.

John Higgins did the arrangement and Paul Lavender the orchestration, but the sound is unmistakably Williams all the way – Symphonic Marches.  The arrangement features Raiders March from the 1981 motion picture Raiders of the Lost Ark; The Imperial March (Darth Vader’s theme) from the 1980 motion picture Star Wars V: The Empire Strikes Back; and, Olympic Fanfare and Theme written in 1984 for the Olympic games in Los Angles, California.

A Trumpeter's Lullaby is a short composition for solo trumpet and orchestra, written by American composer Leroy Anderson (pictured at right) in 1949. The two and a half minute piece was premiered on May 9, 1950 by the Boston Pops Orchestra with Arthur Fiedler conducting and French-born American Roger Voisin as trumpet soloist. It was composed at the request of Voisin, who was principal trumpeter of the Boston Pops Orchestra at the time. It was first recorded on June 18, 1950 with Fiedler conducting Roger Voisin and the Boston Pops. Three months later it was recorded with Anderson himself conducting. The first stereo recording was made in October 1956 with Frederick Fennell conducting the Eastman-Rochester Pops Orchestra.

On the genesis of the piece, the composer states: (A Trumpeter's Lullaby)...had its beginning backstage at Symphony Hall in Boston. In addition to composing and conducting, I was arranger for the Boston Pops Orchestra for a number of years—and after one of the concerts I was sitting talking with the conductor Arthur Fiedler and the first trumpet of the Boston Pops, Roger Voisin. Suddenly Roger Voisin asked me why I didn't write a trumpet solo for him to play with the orchestra that would be different from traditional trumpet solos which are all loud, martial or triumphant. After thinking it over, it occurred to me that I had never heard a lullaby for trumpet so I set out to write one—with a quiet melody based on bugle notes played by the trumpet and with the rest of the orchestra playing a lullaby background.

Bugler’s Holiday has probably motivated more trumpet players to learn (or improve) the art of double-tonguing in the last two decades than any other piece of music.  Although the “Holiday” is relatively uncomplicated harmonically, the performers are given the opportunity to show what they can do with the articulations, the bell tones, and the proper balance of each part.

John Philip Sousa (pictured at left) loved baseball!  His son played in a semi-professional ball team for a time and Sousa’s own band formed a ball team and played the home teams of many of the communities the band visited on their tours.  Sousa also shared a love of good cigars and often visited Cuba to satisfy his need for the very best.  It was on one of those visits that Sousa met with Judge Kennesaw Mountain Landis, baseball’s high commissioner from 1920 until his death in 1944.

Landis asked Sousa to compose this march on the occasion of the National League’s 50th anniversary in 1925.   The march National Game was the result.

John Philip Sousa observed, "Jazz will endure as long as people hear it through their feet instead of their brains." Interesting enough, Sousa's interest in Jazz began with ragtime. He programmed it sparingly during the late 1890s in the United Sates and found that his audiences loved it. And, it was Sousa who was initially responsible for the popularity of ragtime in Europe. He joined a few classical composers who experimented with ragtime and jazz by composing several compositions in the style. From concert programs, we also know that he featured ragtime and Dixieland ensembles with his band.

The Jared Spears At a Dixieland Jazz Funeral is more a traditional approach to the style, featuring the small solo ensemble in two moods of the style (the first being a funeral wake, taking the recently departed soul to the cemetery for burial and the second, being the uplifting party for the spirit).

George Gershwin’s Summertime is an aria composed for the 1935 opera Porgy and Bess. The lyrics are by DuBose Heyward, the author of the novel Porgy on which the opera was based. The song soon became a popular and much recorded jazz standard, described as "without doubt... one of the finest songs the composer ever wrote....Gershwin's highly evocative writing brilliantly mixes elements of jazz and the song styles of African-Americans in the southeast United States from the early twentieth century." Gershwin began composing the song in December 1933, attempting to create his own spiritual in the style of the African American folk music of the period.  Gershwin had completed setting DuBose Heyward's poem to music by February 1934, and spent the next 20 months completing and orchestrating the score of the opera. The song is sung multiple times throughout Porgy and Bess, first by Clara in Act I as a lullaby and soon after as counterpoint to the craps game scene, in Act II in a reprise by Clara, and in Act III by Bess, singing to Clara's baby. Pictured at left are Anne Brown (as Bess) and Todd Duncan (as Porgy).
 
Harold Arlen (pictured at left) (February 15, 1905 - April 23, 1986) was an American composer of popular music, having written over 500 songs, a number of which have become known the world over. In addition to composing the songs for The Wizard of Oz, including the classic 1938 song, "Over the Rainbow,” Arlen is a highly regarded contributor to the Great American Songbook. "Over the Rainbow," in fact, was voted the twentieth century's No. 1 song by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).

Over the Rainbow" (often referred to as "Somewhere Over the Rainbow") is a classic Academy Award-winning ballad song with music by Harold Arlen and lyrics by E.Y. Harburg and was sung by actress Judy Garland in her starring role as Dorothy Gale. Over time it would become Garland's signature song.

In the film, part of the song is played by the MGM orchestra over the opening credits. About five minutes into the movie, actress Judy Garland playing the lead character, Dorothy, sings "Over the Rainbow" after unsuccessfully trying to get her aunt and uncle to listen to her relate an unpleasant incident involving her dog, Toto, and the nasty spinster, Miss Gulch (Margaret Hamilton). Dorothy's Aunt Em tells her to "find yourself a place where you won't get into any trouble", prompting Dorothy to walk off by herself. She muses to Toto "Someplace where there isn't any trouble. Do you suppose there is such a place, Toto? There must be. It's not a place you can get to by a boat, or a train. It's far, far away. Behind the moon, beyond the rain.....", and begins singing the song. The famous sequence itself, as well as the entirety of the Kansas scenes, was directed (though unaccredited) by King Vidor.

Henry Mancini (pictured at right). The Great Race is a 1965 slapstick comedy film starring Jack Lemmon, Tony Curtis, and Natalie Wood, directed by Blake Edwards, written by Blake Edwards and Arthur A. Ross, and with music by Henry Mancini and cinematography by Russell Harlan. The supporting cast includes Peter Falk, Keenan Wynn, Dorothy Provine, Arthur O'Connell and Vivian Vance. The movie cost $12 million, making it the most expensive comedy film at the time.

The Great Race March was heard throughout the movie and functioned as a quasi-theme song.  It is a straight-ahead march typical of the period the movie hoped to show.

Pie in the Face Polka. However, the movie is noted is noted for one scene that was promoted as "the greatest pie fight ever." The Technicolor pie fight scene in the royal bakery was filmed over five days. The first pastry thrown was part of a large cake decorated for the king's coronation. Following this was the throwing of 4,000 pies, the most pies ever filmed in a pie fight. The scene lasts four minutes and twenty seconds and cost $200,000 to shoot; $18,000 just for the pastry.

The pie fight scene paid homage to the early Mack Sennett practice of using a single thrown pie as comedic punctuation, but to a greater degree it was a celebration of classic movie pie fights such as Charlie Chaplin's Behind the Screen (1916), The Battle of the Century (1927) starring Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy, and The Three Stooges' In the Sweet Pie and Pie from 1941. In his script for The Great Race Edwards called for a "Battle of the Century-style pie fight". Though Edwards used 4,000 pies over five days, many of these were used as set dressing for continuity. Laurel and Hardy used 3,000 pies in only one day of shooting, so more are seen flying through the air. Leonard Maltin compared The Great Race pie fight to The Battle of the Century and determined that Laurel and Hardy's pacing was far superior; that the more modern film suffered from an "incomplete understanding of slapstick" while the 1927 pie fight remains "one of the great scenes in all of screen comedy."

John Philip Sousa observed, "Jazz will endure as long as people hear it through their feet instead of their brains." Interesting enough, Sousa's interest in Jazz began with ragtime. He programmed it sparingly during the late 1890s in the United Sates and found that his audiences loved it. And, it was Sousa who was initially responsible for the popularity of ragtime in Europe. He joined a few classical composers who experimented with ragtime and jazz by composing several compositions in the style. From concert programs, we also know that he featured ragtime and Dixieland ensembles with his band.

The Jared Spears At a Dixieland Jazz Funeral is more a traditional approach to the style, featuring the small solo ensemble in two moods of the style (the first being a funeral wake, taking the recently departed soul to the cemetery for burial and the second, being the uplifting party for the spirit).

Henry Fillmore (pictured at left) was one of our most prolific composers with 256 compositions to his record and almost 800 arrangements.  He published under various pseudonyms as well as his own name: Henry Fillmore -114; Gus Beans – 2; Harold Bennett – 65; Ray Hall – 3; Harry Hartley – 6; Al Hayes – 57; Will Huff – 8; and Henrietta Moore – 1.
 

According to Herb Block, Henry got into a conflict with his father (who composed and published liturgical music in Cincinnati) over the kind of music that Henry was composing.  Henry liked march music and said, “I will huff and puff and I will write my own music.” Hence, the name Will Huff.

Fillmore was a true free spirit.  He was brought up by a conservative family in a conservative town.  When he couldn’t do as he wished, he ran away with a circus and played trombone in the circus band.  To top it all off, he married an exotic dancer.

Raggy Trombone  was published in 1918, one of a series of 15 trombone characteristics (smears) that Fillmore wrote.

Karl L. King (pictured at right) joined the circus when he was 19 years old at a time when the circus world was in great need for composers to write special music for the various acts. King’s unique ability and uncanny knack allowed him to write and arrange just to the needs of the circus world.

King played an important role in the Iowa Band Law, state legislation giving municipalities the right to levy a small tax to support a municipal band.  He was also one of the first march composers to write special music for the growing school band programs in America. In addition to writing marches, he also wrote overtures, waltzes, and other selections that could be used for individual concerts or massed band performances.

Emblem of Freedom was one of the earliest marches of Karl King, who was probably 17 years of age at the time of the composition.  The youthful King had been playing in bands in the native Ohio, first with the Thayer Military Band in Canton, and later Fred Neddermeyer’s Band.  This march was written shortly before King joins the band of Robinson’s Famous Circus in 1910 as a baritone player. The first published music of Karl King appeared in 1909 in the catalogues of three different publishers: R.F. Seitz of Glen Rock, Pennsylvania; William Strassner of Canton; and, C.L. Barnhouse in Iowa. Composer/publisher Roland Seitz lucked upon this magnificent march.  Correspondence of Mr. King’s indicates that he sold the march to Seitz in 1909, who printed the first edition in 1910.  Shortly thereafter, King began a long and warm relationship with Barnhouse, who would publish the bulk of King’s 185 marches.  Precisely why this march would up in the Seitz catalogue as opposed to that of Barnhouse is a matter of conjecture.

The march enjoyed a modest commercial success.  According to a letter dated January 16, 1953 to Barnhouse, Mr. King wrote, “Seitz never sold many of it, one reason being that it was too difficult for most bands to play and after he advertised it a couple of times he never published it again.  A few years ago, just before Seitz died I bought the plates from him.” Mr. King was operating his own publishing company by then, and after adding some modern parts and a two-line conductor score, the K.L. King Music House released the “new” march on January 15, 1943, its popularity surged in the early 1950s when it became a favorite of Paul LaValle, who conduct the “Band of America” on nationwide radio broadcasts.  Sales increased rapidly, and Mr. King reprinted the march several times. It was also a great favorite of Leonard B. Smith, who performed it many times live and on radio with his Belle Isle Concert Band, later known as the Detroit Concert Band.

Mr. King played the march frequently with his own band in Fort Dodge, Iowa, when asked what he felt his finest march was, he usually replied Emblem of Freedom. While the original edition was dedicated “To my friend Robert D. Hamilton,” discussions with several of Mr. King’s acquaintances and former bandsmen have not yielded the identity of this gentleman. Mr. King liked to mention that the first strain contained some of his finest contrapuntal writing. Having been a self-taught composer, Mr. King would explain his method of counterpoint simply as “starting a second line when the first lines stops.”  Five years after Mr. King passed away in 1971, the Barnhouse Company acquired the catalogue of the K.L. King Music House, including this splendid march. (Andrew Glover)

John Philip Sousa (pictured at left) was in his fifth year as director of the United States Marine Band when this march was composed in 1885.  “Sound Off” was apparently intended for ceremonial use by the Marine Band.  As he had done on previous occasions, Sousa used a marching command as the title of his composition.  It was dedicated to Major George Porter Houston, one of Sousa’s superiors at Marine Barracks, Washington.  The Corps “Manual for Field Music,” published in 1935, reports that the ceremonial “Sound Off” dates from the time of the Crusades.  The musicians would march and counter-march in front of the soldiers designated for the Crusades as a ceremony of dedication.  Part of the “Sound Off” tradition is the playing of three chords while standing fast, preceding the music actually performed on the march.  The three chords are thought to signify “three cheers” from the assembled crowds.  Today, the Marine Band has eliminated the three chords preceding the ceremonial “Sound Off” and uses only percussion to signal the march.


Stars and Stripes Forever The march is considered the finest march ever written, and at the same time one of the most patriotic ever conceived.  As reported in the Philadelphia Public Ledger (May 15, 1897) “ ... It is stirring enough to rouse the American eagle from his crag, and set him to shriek exultantly while he hurls his arrows at the aurora borealis.”  (referring to the concert the Sousa Band gave the previous day at the Academy of Music).

The march was not quite so well received though and actually got only an over-average rating for a new Sousa march.  Yet, its popularity grew as Mr. Sousa used it during the Spanish-American War as a concert closer.  Coupled with his Trooping of the Colors , the march quickly gained a vigorous response from audiences and critics alike.  In fact, audiences rose from their chairs when the march was played.  Mr. Sousa added to the entertainment value of the march by having the piccolo(s) line up in front of the band for the final trio, and then added the trumpets and trombones join them on the final repeat of the strain.

The march was performed on almost all of Mr. Sousa’s concerts and always drew tears to the eyes of the audience.  The author has noted the same emotional response of audiences to the march today.  The march has been named as the national march of The United States.

There are two commentaries of how the march was inspired.  The first came as the result of an interview on Mr. Sousa’s patriotism.  According to Mr. Sousa, the march was written with the inspiration of God.

“I was in Europe and I got a cablegram that my manager was dead.  I was in Italy and I wished to get home as soon as possible, I rushed to Genoa, then to Paris and to England and sailed for America.  On board the steamer as I walked miles up and down the deck, back and forth, a mental band was playing ‘Stars and Stripes Forever.’  Day after day as I walked it persisted in crashing into my very soul. I wrote it on Christmas Day, 1896.”

The second, and more probable inspiration for the march, came from Mr. Sousa’s own homesickness.  He had been away from his homeland for some time on tour, and told an interviewer:

“In a kind of dreamy way, I used to think over old days at Washington when I was leader of the Marine Band ... when we played at all public functions, and I could see the Stars and Stripes flying from the flagstaff in the grounds of the White House just as plainly as if I were back there again.”

“Then I began to think of all the countries I had visited, of the foreign people I had met, of the vast differences between America and American people and other countries and other peoples, and that flag our ours became glorified ... and to my imagination it seemed to be the biggest, grandest, flag in the world, and I could not get back under it quick enough.”

“It was in this impatient, fretful state of mind that the inspiration to compose ‘The Stars and Stripes Forever’ came to me.” 

Irving Berlin (pictured at right). With a life that spanned more than 100 years and a catalogue that boasted over 1000 songs, Irving Berlin epitomized Jerome Kern's famous maxim, that "Irving Berlin has no place in American music - he is American music".

Irving Berlin was born Israel Berlin in May 1888. When his father died, Berlin, just turned 13, took to the streets in various jobs, working as a busker, singing for pennies, then as a singer/waiter in a Chinatown café. In 1907 he published his first song, Marie From Sunny Italy and by 1911 he had his first major international hit, Alexander's Ragtime Band. 

Over the next five decades, Irving Berlin produced an outpouring of ballads, dance numbers, novelty tunes and love songs that defined American popular song for much of the century. In a class by itself is his beloved paean to his beloved country, God Bless America.  On Armistice Day, 1939, Kate Smith sang for the first time one of the beloved songs of our people – God Bless America by Irving Berlin.

 


 

The Medina Community Band 

Marcus Neiman, conductor
Curtis Amrein, associate conductor

Wednesday Evening, July 4th, 2012
8:30 p.m.

 

Program

 

National Anthem, The Star Spangled Banner (1931) ..... Francis Scott Key/John Philip Sousa 

March, Symphonic Marches (1984) .......................................... John Williams/John Higgins 

Trumpet Solo, A Trumpeter’s Lullaby (1950) .......................... Leroy Anderson 

Curtis Amrein, soloist 

Trumpet Trio, Bugler’s Holiday (1954) ..................................  Leroy Anderson 

Curtis Amrein, Marcia Nelson-Kline, and Paul Rocco, soloist 

March, The National Game (1925) ...................................... John Philip Sousa 

Vocal solos: 

   Summertime  (from Porgy and Bess) (1935)....................... George Gershwin 

   Somewhere Over the Rainbow (from Wizard of Oz) (1938).... Harold Arlen/Warren Barker

Maria Jacobs, soloist 

At the movies, The Great Race (1965) 

   The Great Race March ........................................................ Henry Mancini/John Moss * 

   Pie in the Face Polka  ......................................................... Henry Mancini/Johnny Vinson 

Amy Dragga, Mary Ann Grof-Neiman, Ed Lichtenberg, and Vicki Smith, soloists 

Dixieland, At a Dixieland Jazz Funeral (1980) ............................ Jared Spears *

Vicki Smith, clarinet; Marcia Nelson-Kline, trumpet; Lee Harper, trombone;

and Kyle Snyder, tuba, soloist 

Characteristic, Raggy Trombone (1918) ................................... Henry Fillmore *

March, Emblem of Freedom (1943) .............................................. Karl L. King *

March, Sound Off! (1880) ................................................. John Philip Sousa *

Patriotic, Armed Forces Salute (1980) ................... arranged by Robert Lowden *

National March, The Stars and Stripes Forever (1896).......... John Philip Sousa 

Patriotic, God Bless America (1918)....................................... Irving Berlin/Erik Leidzen *